CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Enceladus Rev 131 Flyby Raw Preview

These raw, unprocessed images were taken during Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on May 17 and 18, 2010.

May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 17, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #2 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 17, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #3 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 17, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #4 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 18, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #5 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 18, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #6 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 18, 2010.
May 18, 2010: Enceladus "Rev 131" Flyby Raw Preview #7 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on May 18, 2010.
Alliance Member Comments
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Jun 28, 2010 at 6:12 PM):
Mercury_3488: Way to go, Andrew! Good job explaining why the sky looks bright in this image.
Mercury_3488 (Jun 28, 2010 at 1:43 PM):
Hi Tish, If I recall correctly, Enceladus is back lit by the E-Ring created by Enceladus orbiting Saturn. Enceladus is also at very high phase (very narrow crescent), with the sun not far out of the frame to the left.

The image is also 'upsidedown' i.e south is top, but it is a stunner. :)

Andrew Brown.
tish (Jun 27, 2010 at 1:50 PM):
June 27, 2010, I am still trying to understand this image. Why do the geysers seem to have too much depth in this shot? I believe we are looking through the plumes toward the Sun, correct? Please help with more analysis.
Fantastic!
Thanks.
-Tish

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