CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Mimas and Calypso Rev 126 Flyby Raw Preview

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moons Mimas and Calypso were taken on Feb. 13, 2010.

Feb 15, 2010: Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Mimas was taken by Cassini on Feb. 13, 2010.
Feb 15, 2010: Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #2 - This raw, unprocessed image of Mimas was taken by Cassini on Feb. 13, 2010.
Feb 15, 2010: Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #3 - This raw, unprocessed image of Mimas was taken by Cassini on Feb. 13, 2010.
Feb 15, 2010: Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #4 - This raw, unprocessed image of Mimas was taken by Cassini on Feb. 13, 2010.
Feb 15, 2010: Calypso "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Calypso was taken by Cassini on Feb. 13, 2010.
Alliance Member Comments
NeKto (Feb 19, 2010 at 9:12 AM):
Thank you Carolyn. Hyperion it is. the effects of porosity are far more vivid there than on other moons, but the charector of the "slump" craters sugest to me that even some of the hydrodynamicly stable moons have "crusts" with higher porosity than i expected before Cassini. if i can recall the other moons i've seen them on, i'll let you know.
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Feb 18, 2010 at 11:38 AM):
Nekto: I believe you are talking about Hyperion. And yes, that is the process at work on Hyperion and already described in print: http://ciclops.org/media/sp/2007/3345_8239_0.pdf
NeKto (Feb 18, 2010 at 10:16 AM):
Carolyn, i greatly appreciate the fact that the team leader at CICLOPS can look at these images, see the gist of all the scientific information they offer, and still see the resemblance to the head of a fish. perhaps that is one of the reasons why so many of the images you (the whole team) have shared with us are so artistic, awe inspiring, and breathtaking.
one thing that strikes me about Mimas is what i have been calling "slump craters" a formation typical on one of the outer irregular moons whos name excapes me at the monent. i am refering to craters that sugjest low density crust with a goodly amount of space between ice crystals. making craters that look like the impactors compress more than excavate.
Rod Walker (Feb 18, 2010 at 9:18 AM):
There also appears to be the upper half of an Egyptian mummy holding the crook & flail at the left of the crater!
carolyn (CICLOPS) (Feb 16, 2010 at 8:09 PM):
Those of you who are interested to know how small satellites like Calypso come to have the shapes that they do should look at the Porco et al. (2007) paper on http://ciclops.org/sci/papers.php . (Look at the top of the list under 2007). In that paper we show that the shapes of the small sats near to the rings were likely due to accretion of ring material; for the inner most ones very close to the rings, the accretion must have occurred around a dense shard. For the outer small sats, like Calypso, within the region of the bigger moons, the formation process is less evident from their shape. But its surface shows how it has accumulated material. in any case, looks like the head of a fish (pointing to the left), doesn't it?
ultomatt (Feb 15, 2010 at 4:45 PM):
Love the images of Mimas, especially the high res imagery of the inside of Herschel crater. Quite a chaotic landscape! I've checked through the raw imagery and there appears to be a borderline between the crater wall and the slump features...almost like a black outline...very curious. There appears to be a layer of dark material at the transition between the avalanche features and the steep crater wall. I've been waiting a long time to see details inside this amazing crater...you haven't disappointed, once again!

And then there's Calypso at what, 30 kilometers in the long axis? What an amazing image of that tiny bit o' real estate! The flow features on the surface bear a resemblance to glacial features on Earth, with a serpentine path evident. There appears to be a river of ice flowing from top right to center bottom in the image. And the near total absence of craters makes it clear that this is a very young surface that has likely been the result of the accumulation of ices on the surface, from the E-ring. I haven't been able to find a reference to Calypso's gravity, but it certainly is minuscule, and the flow features would move in interesting paths with so little friction and weight. Seems like ices could almost literally float in gravity so low. Wouldn't take a lot of energy to move the particles "downhill".

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