CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Special Holiday Raw Preview!

These raw, unprocessed images of Enceladus and Prometheus were taken during the Christmas Season 2009.

Dec 27, 2009: Special Holiday Raw Preview #1 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on Dec. 25, 2009.
Dec 27, 2009: Special Holiday Raw Preview #2 - This raw, unprocessed image of Enceladus was taken by Cassini on Dec. 25, 2009.
Dec 27, 2009: Special Holiday Raw Preview #3 - This raw, unprocessed image of Prometheus was taken by Cassini on Dec. 26, 2009.
Dec 27, 2009: Special Holiday Raw Preview #4 - This raw, unprocessed image of Prometheus was taken by Cassini on Dec. 26, 2009.
Alliance Member Comments
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971 (Dec 31, 2009 at 3:54 PM):
Thank you ultomatt for writing about the Feb. 17 Mimas flyby. For me, it's interesting to get images of Herschel crater at higher resolution,too. In the actual list of the 2010 tour dates they rescheduled it to the 13th of Feb. , 2010. Shortly after the last one of the 2 very interesting 2009 Enc Nov. flybys there was a flyby of Rhea not listed as a "close" one, but nevertheless having enabled new looks of Rhea. ( with tectonic features similar to Dione ) This perhaps means that at Mimas this will be possible without a close flyby. That Rhea flyby was at 24000km, 15000 mls.

Thank you for writing here of those flybys: Rhea Mar. 2nd and Dione April 6th.

At the Equinox Mission there aren't planned any close flybys of Tethys. But I think that imaging of the remarkably large Odysseus basin ( not only being a 'crater' ) at many better resolution than the best images of it by the Cassini spacecraft available at this moment would be very interesting.

After looking at the actual list of the 2010 tour dates I found those flybys among other ones: On Jan. 10 at Methone at 27000 km, 17000 mls, On Feb. 13 at Mimas at 10000 km, 6000 mls ( as mentioned ) and on June 3 at Tethys, 53000 km, 33000 mls. Perhaps that Tethys flyby will include almost Cassini-class Hi-Res images of the Odysseus basin.
stowaway (Dec 29, 2009 at 4:59 AM):
Speechless! These are really great pictures. Thanks so much Captain Carolyn and the Crew.
ultomatt (Dec 29, 2009 at 0:57 AM):
Great imagery. Titan is, of course, the jewel of the system, but every single moon has a unique story to tell. I am looking forward to the close flyby's coming up in 2010 of some "lesser" moons, like Mimas on Feb. 17 (not listed as a "close" flyby, but I mention it cause I hope that higher res imagery of Herschel will be possible) Rhea on March 2nd, Helene on March 3rd, Dione April 6th, Enceladus on April 27th & May 18th. The small moons have a lot to reveal at a much finer scale than the global attention at Titan. Don't get me wrong, the focus on Titan was clearly the proper thing to do, but personally I'm a little sad that more flybys of Iapetus weren't possible, but I understand that it is further out and more fuel intensive to get to. My point is, as in the Japanese success at Itokawa, it is clear that small celestial objects have unique data to provide to the ever expanding puzzle that is the solar system.
manuelgis (Dec 28, 2009 at 1:48 AM):
thanks for the beautifull ghift for christmas! buon natale atutti voi e buon lavoro
Frankypouh (Dec 27, 2009 at 10:48 PM):
This is a nice gift!
Prometheus looks like a space whale passing quietely.
What about the sting shape in the left, don't tell me it is the F ring?
Enjoy your Hollyday Season!
Your work is a masterpiece of all arts!
Francois
Tommy (Dec 27, 2009 at 8:02 PM):
Those shots of Prometheus are simply beautiful in their simplicity and detail. I thought I was done with potatoes for the year, thanks Cassini team!
Arnaud (Dec 27, 2009 at 2:15 PM):
Incredible, those fountains on Enceladus!!!
brainiac9129 (Dec 27, 2009 at 1:32 PM):
Wonderful images, Team. Specially the Enceladus close-up.

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