CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Tethys 'Rev 164' Raw Preview #2
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Tethys 'Rev 164' Raw Preview #2
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  This raw, unprocessed image of Tethys was taken on April 14, 2012 and received on Earth April 15, 2012. The camera was pointing toward Tethys at approximately 17502 kilometers away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. The image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the Planetary Data System in 2013.

The Cassini Solstice Mission is a joint United States and European endeavor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists of scientists from the US, England, France, and Germany. The imaging operations center and team lead (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini Solstice Mission visit http://ciclops.org, http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI
Released: April 16, 2012
Image/Caption Information


Alliance Member Comments
thetonster (Apr 25, 2012 at 4:39 AM):
R164 raw 2 shows mostly crater-saturated terrain, but in the upper left quadrant a couple of features are noteworthy.
The first is that Fault scarp from the large, irregular crater to the double crater (likely due to a simultaneous impact of two bodies).
The scarp casts shadows along 2/3 of its length, then suddenly changes to a bright cliff; this suggests a rotation has occurred on an axis normal to the fault.
Second is a lobate flow, off the rim of ‘North Dike’ crater, whose sharpness of form makes it seem to float above the underlying landscape. It appears to be a viscous flow, rather like Pahoehoe lava, in contrast to the loose-matter flows in ‘South Dike’ crater.
Crater chains abound in this scene, too.
Tethys is definitely interesting, and probably has more surprises for us.

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