CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Smooth and Rough Enceladus
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Cassini looks down at craters near the north pole of Enceladus.

Cratered surfaces on solar system moons indicate older terrains, while smooth surfaces are generally younger, and therefore indicative of processes which eliminated the craters. See PIA08353 to learn more about the true nature of these surfaces and the processes at work on this geologically active moon.

The moon's north pole lies on the terminator to the right of the craters seen in this image. Lit terrain seen here is on the anti-Saturn side and trailing hemisphere of Enceladus (504 kilometers, 313 miles across).

The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 11, 2009. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 472,000 kilometers (293,000 miles) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 57 degrees. Image scale is 3 kilometers (2 miles) per pixel.

The Cassini Equinox Mission is a joint United States and European endeavor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists of scientists from the US, England, France, and Germany. The imaging operations center and team lead (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini Equinox Mission visit http://ciclops.org, http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Released: October 14, 2009 (PIA 11601)
Image/Caption Information
  Smooth and Rough Enceladus
PIA 11601

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Alliance Member Comments
mayanhurakan (Oct 26, 2009 at 10:55 PM):
ANAKA NURAKAN MAYAN LEAGUE OF NATIONS OUR SIPREAM LEADER CE'CALCALI DID NOT THINK THAT I WOULD RETURN.CONSERVE ENERGY ON CASSINI KEEP IT IN WORKING ORDER FOR NEXT TWENTY YEARS.
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971 (Oct 26, 2009 at 3:01 AM):
Finally, the very long wait since the last close Enceladus Flyby ( 2008 Halloween Flyby ) is almost over now. In a week our Cassini spacecraft will have its Enc flyby on November, 2nd.

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