CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Odysseus and Penelope
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Two large craters named after characters in Homer's Odyssey take the stage in this scene on Saturn's moon Tethys.

The crater on the right is the Odysseus crater (450 kilometers, 280 miles across). The one on the left is Penelope, named after the wife of Odysseus. See PIA 08149 to learn more.

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn side of Tethys (1062 kilometers, 660 miles across). North on Tethys is up and rotated 44 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 12, 2009. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 931,000 kilometers (578,000 miles) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 33 degrees. Image scale is 6 kilometers (3 miles) per pixel.

The Cassini Equinox Mission is a joint United States and European endeavor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists of scientists from the US, England, France, and Germany. The imaging operations center and team lead (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini Equinox Mission visit http://ciclops.org, http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Released: May 19, 2009 (PIA 11495)
Image/Caption Information
  Odysseus and Penelope
PIA 11495

Avg Rating: 8.75/10

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Alliance Member Comments
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971 (May 24, 2009 at 12:35 PM):
Here I'm seeing no new details of the Odysseus Crater ( For me it's more a basin than a crater ) . There was still no close flyby of the Cassini spacecraft taking pictures of 'Cassini class' high resolution of the Odysseus crater. For me I believe very much that the ( my ) results of such images would be interesting. The same kind of being interesting for me would be close-up images of a close Mimas flyby which hasn't been made up to now, too.

But up to now, at least our spacecraft has taken better views of Mimas and better views of the Odysseus crater than the Voyager spacecraft.
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971 (May 24, 2009 at 12:24 PM):
This view is 'Voyager class' by my opinion. ( It's not 'Cassini class' as e. g. 'Hi-Res on Tethys'. )
Nevertheless I'm seeing good details on it, mainly: The familiar crater at the left is showing here its depth easily; at the top and the lower left there are ( probably ) 2 parallel-running canyon systems that could be Ithaca Chasma; ( changing the curvature of the moon's limb at the lower left thus they're deep ) and a large crater at the top slightly right to the middle that is looking many more degraded than the familiar left one. The two parallel features ( I think ) are running through the mentioned crater at the top indicating that they're younger than it.
For me it's not a truely new view of Tethys but still of medium interest.

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