CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

Enceladus "Rev 91" Flyby Raw Preview #1
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Enceladus "Rev 91" Flyby Raw Preview #1
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  This image was taken during Cassini's close flyby with Enceladus on Oct. 31, 2008.

The image was with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 31, 2008 at a distance of approximately 16,000 kilometers (10,000 miles) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 73 degrees. Image scale is 186 meters (611 feet) per pixel.


The Cassini Equinox Mission is a joint United States and European endeavor. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists of scientists from the US, England, France, and Germany. The imaging operations center and team lead (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini Equinox Mission visit http://ciclops.org, http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Released: November 1, 2008
Image/Caption Information


Alliance Member Comments
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971 (Nov 5, 2008 at 3:13 PM):
My opinion is: The very latest surface history ( by geological terms ) is 'written' on Enc's surface of this picture. The 2008 Halloween flyby identified some of the known jet sources which I think was a difficult work. Congratulations to the Cassini team for these identifications ! Most probable I think the jets erupt from the bottom of young, deep 'sulci' .
Now I think we can already 'read' some of this history from the surface.

And just a few days after this encounter Cassini is speeding to Titan for a very important encounter.
balrog (Nov 1, 2008 at 3:21 PM):
Congratulation once again on a successful flyby..looking forward to seeing more images of this fascinating satallite.
LOONYMAN (Nov 1, 2008 at 12:36 PM):
Good work again team.......Big respect from over the pond here in Sweden!!!
Red_dragon (Nov 1, 2008 at 11:04 AM):
Weeeeell done!!. Although the image is a bit "corrupted", it's a really tantalizing one. Congratulations to CICLOPS as well -of course- to the Nav team for having made this possible despite it was challenging (read the T46 PDF to see the reasons in: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/products/pdfs/20081103_titan_mission_description.pdf)

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