CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

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Imaging Diary - Cassini

 
12/5/16
Chaos at Hyperion
PIA20512
 
6/2/15
Farewell to Hyperion
PIA17193
 
5/28/15
Hyperion 'Rev 216' Raw Preview #1
 
5/28/15
Hyperion 'Rev 216' Raw Preview #1
 
5/28/15
Hyperion 'Rev 216' Raw Preview #1
 

 

 
5/28/15
Hyperion 'Rev 216' Raw Preview #1
 
5/28/15
Hyperion 'Rev 216' Raw Preview #1
 
3/19/12
Distant Hyperion
PIA14600
 
11/21/11
Odd Hyperion
PIA14583
 
10/31/11
Spongy Hyperion
PIA14580
 

 

 
8/26/11
Hyperion 'Rev 152' Raw Preview #5
 
8/26/11
Hyperion 'Rev 152' Raw Preview #4
 
8/26/11
Hyperion 'Rev 152' Raw Preview #3
 
8/26/11
Hyperion 'Rev 152' Raw Preview #2
 
8/26/11
Hyperion 'Rev 152' Raw Preview #1
 

 

 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #6
 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #5
 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #4
 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #3
 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #2
 

 

 
11/29/10
Hyperion 'Rev 141' Raw Preview #1
 
11/5/09
Pitted Hyperion
PIA11617
 
12/11/07
Pummeled Hyperion
PIA09790
 
5/15/07
Pitted Hyperion
PIA08940
 
3/26/07
Unusual Hyperion
PIA08904
 

 

 
12/29/06
Multicolor Hyperion
PIA08349
 
11/14/06
Hyperion's Pitted Surface
PIA08309
 
2/3/06
Rough and Tumble Hyperion
PIA07683
 
12/6/05
Color Variation on Hyperion
PIA07768
 
9/29/05
Flight to Hyperion
PIA07742
 

 

 
9/29/05
Hyperion: Parting Glance
PIA07739
 
9/29/05
Hyperion's Unusual Craters
PIA07741
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #9
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #10
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #8
 

 

 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #7
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #6
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #5
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #4
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #1
 

 

 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #2
 
9/26/05
Hyperion Raw Preview #3
 
7/11/05
Encountering Hyperion (Movie)
PIA06243
 
5/6/05
Hyperion's Nose
PIA06643
 
4/8/05
Hyperion's Face
PIA06623
 

 

 
3/18/05
Hyperion Hoopla
PIA06608
 
1/13/05
Strange Hyperion
PIA06562
 
10/22/04
Day and Night on Hyperion
PIA06504
 
9/28/04
Hyperion From Afar
PIA06486
 
8/12/04
Tumbling Hyperion
PIA05433
 

 


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Newsroom - Press Releases

 
CASSINI SCIENTISTS WRING OUT THE DETAILS ON SPONGY HYPERION - Jul 4, 2007
 ... WRING OUT THE DETAILS ON SPONGY HYPERION Scientists on NASA's Cassini mission ... understanding of why the odd moon Hyperion has such an unusual appearance.The ... strange, sponge-like appearance of ...


 
SPONGY-LOOKING HYPERION TUMBLES INTO VIEW - Jul 11, 2005
 ... Advisory: July 11, 2005SPONGY-LOOKING HYPERION TUMBLES INTO VIEWTwo new Cassini ... views of Saturn's tumbling moon Hyperion offer the best looks yet at one ... during Cassini's first brush with Hyperion.Hyperion ...


 
CASSINI SENDS FINAL CLOSE VIEWS OF ODD MOON HYPERION - Jun 2, 2015
 ... FINAL CLOSE VIEWS OF ODD MOON HYPERIONImage Advisory: June 2, 2015NASA's ... approach to Saturn's oddball moon Hyperion, upholding the moon's reputation ... the solar system. The views show Hyperion's ...


 
CASSINI PREPARES FOR LAST UP-CLOSE LOOK AT HYPERION - May 28, 2015
 ... PREPARES FOR LAST UP-CLOSE LOOK AT HYPERIONPress Release: May 28, 2015NASA's ... large, irregularly shaped moon Hyperion on Sunday, May 31.The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft will pass Hyperion at a distance ...


 
CASSINI'S DOUBLEHEADER FLYBYS SCORE HOME RUN - Sep 30, 2005
 ... flybys of Saturn moons Tethys and Hyperion last weekend, coming closer than ... scarred, ancient surface, while Hyperion is a strange, spongy-looking body ... on Saturn's oddly tumbling moon Hyperion.Images ...



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Newsroom - Special Events

 
Cassini Sends Final Close Views of Odd Moon Hyperion - Jun 2, 2015
 ... approach to Saturn's oddball moon Hyperion. (Image Advisory can be found ...


 
HYPERION REV 216 RAW PREVIEW - Jun 1, 2015
 NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured these raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Hyperion during a close flyby on May 31, 2015. This flyby marks the mission's final close approach of Saturn's irregularly shaped moon, Hyperion.


 
Cassini Prepares for Last Up-Close Look at Hyperion - May 28, 2015
 ... PREPARES FOR LAST UP-CLOSE LOOK AT HYPERIONPress Release: May 28, 2015NASA's ... large, irregularly shaped moon Hyperion on Sunday, May 31.The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft will pass Hyperion at a distance ...


 
Hyperion Rev 152 Raw Preview - Aug 26, 2011
 ... unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Hyperion were taken on Aug. 25, 2011, as ... conducted its second closest flyby of Hyperion at a distance of about 15,500 miles (25,000 kilometers).Hyperion is ...


 
Hyperion Rev 141 Raw Preview - Nov 29, 2010
 These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Hyperion were taken on Nov. 28, 2010.


 
Cassini Buzzes Hyperion - Sep 29, 2005
 Cassini completed its recent double-header of flybys on September 26, with a spectacular 500 kilometer (310 mile) pass above the oddly modified surface of Hyperion.


 
Hyperion Close Flyby Raw Preview - Sep 26, 2005
 These raw, unprocessed images were taken during Cassini's very close flyby of the icy moon Hyperion on September 26, 2005.







Home - Captain's Logs

 
Spectacular Sights at 10 AU - Dec 22, 2005
 ... of Enceladus, and one each of Hyperion, Dione, and Rhea -- occurred in ... know these bodies intimately. Hyperion is perhaps the strangest yet seen. ... packed and deeply etched pits on Hyperion were ...


 
Approach to Saturn Begins - Feb 27, 2004
 ... the chaotically rotating moon, Hyperion. In April, when our camera's resolution ...







Newsroom - Looking Ahead

 
Rev152 - Aug 11, 2011
 


 
Rev141 - Nov 18, 2010
 


 
Rev140 - Oct 27, 2010
 


 
Rev129 - Mar 26, 2010
 


 
Rev128 - Mar 10, 2010
 



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Alliance Member Comments


Hyperion Raw Preview #5
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971      
2008-10-11 18:07:23

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The largest crater visible here is startingly large, it's about the same size as Hyperion's dimensions. ( At least I believe it to be a crater. ) I think that when that crater was produced Hyperion broke up. Then its fragments got lost from its orbit and one large fragment remained the Hyperion of today. I roughly estimated the size of the old ( icy, spherical ) Hyperion: 600 to 800 km in diameter.


Profile of Janus
Mercury_3488      
2008-08-14 06:51:30

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Great image. Saw this once before as a shadowy noisey raw image. It's great to see that some of the smaller moons are also being researched like Hyperion, Janus, Epimetheus, Helene, Telesto, Phoebe, etc. Wonder if Janus is like Epimetheus, an icy rubble pile held together by gravity? Does anyone know when the Helene encounter will be? Is there any chance of a close passes of Calypso, Telesto (again) Polydeuces, etc? Andrew Brown.


The North Polar Region of Enceladus
Harry      
2008-03-14 09:04:21

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Such an awesome image! I expect there will be many papers written on the interpretations of this terrain. I wonder if the prominences in Aladdin & Ali Baba are extinct geysers. Infra red imaging showing the extent of the southern hot zone would be wonderful. The "faults" of the Samarkand Sulci perimeter seem to be gapped. Quasi-parallel extension zones implies that the center may be a subduction zone. Hopefully the radar imaging might provide some elevation details of the region to help interpret what is happening. Obviously, the internal sturcture of Enceladus must be differentiated. So many new and wonderful concepts to test. It is hard to imagine: Sector 6 containing moons so different as Hyperion, Titan and Enceladus along with the rings all around the same planet. Anyone thinking these moons are simple structures with a boring history needs to get a cup of coffee! Congratulations again on such wonderful science. Harry in Houston


The Rays of Rhea
Mercury_3488      
2008-03-01 20:37:22

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Hi Red_dragon, It is so interesting to see how different the individual moons are within a particular system. With Saturn's system, the difference between Titan & Mimas is most striking. Phoebe almost certainly is an interloper from the KBO, Hyperion is just odd, Enceladus, highly active, Dione also probably moderately active, Tethys, Rhea, & Mimas as dead as door nails. Iapetus is extremely fascinating for other reasons. I suspect the Uranian moons had more radiactive elements & it is interesting to see, how much denser Titania & Oberon are to Saturn's similarly sized moons Rhea & Iapetus. Clearly the Saturn & Uranus systems have evolved very differently. I like your comparison of the differences between Io & Callisto in the Jovian system. True, Jupiter's immensely gravity & tidal influences have much to do with this. Even so, Io is poor in volatiles, but heavily differentiated & contains a large amout of heavy materials (Io has the highest density & surface gravity of the solar system's moons). Callisto appears to be a mixture of rock & ice, with a slight concentration of rock towards the centre, but not enough to form a core. Probably much like Rhea, which appears to be much like a smaller Callisto. Andrew Brown.


Coming to Light
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-16 08:22:03

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Hi Carolyn, Thank you very much, I did wonder if Iapetus would require too much DeltaV? I know it is early days yet (Cassini has still got years left), but a USEFULLY scientific end to Cassini's mission in my opinion is justifiable. Instead of just sending Cassini into Saturn (unless it is a day side approach with images being taken & transmitted in real time of the kronian weather systems), I still say an impact on one of the moons would be far more useful. Dione or Hyperion perhaps? Images being taken & transmitted in real time, remeber the NEAR / Shoemaker landing on asteroid 433 Eros? Or a complete radar mapping of Titan, with Cassini entering a polar orbit around the giant hazy moon & SAR the entire globe, like Magellan did with Venus? I know, it is just ideas, but this board allows for ideas to be shared, how unlikely or likely they are to succeed. Unfortunately, this is something that we all here on at the CICLOPS Alliance, who care so much about this mission will have to face one day with Cassini. I admit, I was so upset when the Galileo mission ended, Cassini will be no different. Andrew Brown.


Cosmic Blasting Zone
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-16 07:57:58

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I've sometimes wondered about this also. Hyperion is the least dense of the known solid bodies in the entire solar system, only 0.55g cm3. This suggests a rubble pile held together by gravity & / or a more coherent body with huge internal voids. My bet is the rubble pile. Like polystyrene, it is possible to punch deep but narrow holes in it. We see similar here on Hyperion. I had seen one suggestion bantered about elsewhere (not my idea), that Titan formed in a heliocentric orbit at one of Saturn's lagrange points & over time, Titan was drawn towards Saturn. Hyperion was suggested to be Titan's former moon. The mass ratio between Hyperion & Titan is identical to that of Dione with Polydeuces & Helene as well as Tethys with Telesto & Calypso. These facts were part of a thought exercise elsewhere. Hyperion being a former comet is an interesting idea. Remember that Phoebe is almost certainly a captured comet / KBO. Also remember the floors of these deep craters are dark, so they absorb the very little solar energy there is & can burn through the ice. I am sure there are a whole multitude of reasons for Hyperion's weird situation. A most fascinating object.


Cosmic Blasting Zone
Harry      
2008-02-15 16:28:54

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Of all the Cassini images, this is the one I keep coming back too. Somehow, I wonder if Hyperion is a not a normal (whatever that is) cratered moon but, it is a burned-out comet. The density of craters seem to put Hyperion out of place. Hyperion has preserved evidence of many more craters that other bodies in the region. Maybe it is much older or from a differnt part of the solar system closely resembling a shooting gallery. I wonder if Hyperion is actually a comet that was captured by Saturn. The craters might actually be vents from when the comet was active. The steep, straight sides of the craters/vents might be determined by the angle of repose of the ejecta material coming from the vent that did not attain escape velocity. Or, maybe the geometry of the vents is normal as they slow-down and freeze after an active cycle. The dark material in the bottom of the "vents" might be carbon-rich material from the interior of the comet. Also, the dark material could have higher density than the volatiles that escaped the vent or be higher mass "pebbles" that accumulated at the bottom of the vent. Hyperion has so low a density as to suggest that it is porous. The interior cavities may be the voids left by the volatiles that escaped the body while it was active during passes through the inner solar system. These residual cavities might not have collapsed as the comet evolved. They may have collapsed later when the interior was shocked by a metor impact. Hyperion's irregular shape may be determined by the later cave-ins. The morphology of the cave-ins might correlate to how the volatiles had accumulated during the genesis of the body that is now Hyperion. If Hyperion is the nucleus of an old comet, Saturn may have caught it while it was still active from a pass by the sun. If it was still venting while in orbit, it could be a source of the material in Saturn's rings. Anyway, this is a lot of conjecture. A hand-full of pictures and a few scientific measurements have generated a myriad of question. I think this is wonderful.


Chiseled Away
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-14 13:49:16

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Sorry for my dreadful typo everyone, I meant the DAWN spacecraft, not GAWN (stupid me). Hyperion is certainly one of the most iregularly shaped objects yet seen closely by spacecraft, with the possible exceptions of asteroids 243 Ida & 433 Eros. The Neptune moon Proteus is sort of squarish or cuboid with rounded edges, really quite strange. I forgot the KBO 136108 2003 EL61, a very large 'cigar shaped' icy body (1,950 KM x 960 KM). In addition to 2 Pallas (570 x 525 x 500 KM), we also have 4 Vesta (575 x 560 x 460 KM). However Hyperion is far more out of round than either 2 Pallas or 4 Vesta. Very interesting topic this & Hyperion remains the largest seriously irregulalrly shaped object yet seen up close (had the Galileo spaceraft launched in May 1986, we would have seen the very large main belt asteroid 29 Amphitrite in close up).


Chiseled Away
carolyn      
2008-02-14 08:39:36

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We've been looking into this issue. Proteus didn't immediately come to mind because it is apparently not as irregular as Hyperion, which is dramatically so. So, we've altered the caption to make it more specific and correct. Thanks for pointing this out to us!


Epimetheus Revealed
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-03 11:59:29

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Most of these smaller moons appear to be 'rubble piles' of ice & maybe rock. Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, Telesto, Calypso, Polydeuces, Helene, etc. Phoebe appears to be more coherent, but then Phoebe most likely formed elsewhere, maybe the Kuiper Belt, got ejected & then captured by Saturn later on. The other smaller Saturn moons & Jupiter's Amalthea, appear to be rubble piles held together by gravity.


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