CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

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Imaging Diary - Cassini

 
8/15/11
Dramatic Helene
PIA12779
 
7/4/11
High-Res Helene
PIA12773
 
6/20/11
Helene 'Rev 149' Raw Preview #4
 
6/20/11
Helene 'Rev 149' Raw Preview #3
 
6/20/11
Helene 'Rev 149' Raw Preview #2
 

 

 
6/20/11
Helene 'Rev 149' Raw Preview #1
 
3/21/11
Flying by Helene
PIA12758
 
2/1/11
Helene 'Rev 144' Raw Preview #2
 
2/1/11
Helene 'Rev 144' Raw Preview #1
 
9/17/10
Catching Helene
PIA12723
 

 

 
6/11/10
Closest View of Helene
PIA12653
 
3/3/10
Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #1
 
3/3/10
Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #3
 
3/3/10
Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #2
 
3/3/10
Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #4
 

 

 
12/29/08
Helene Attends Dione
PIA10544
 
8/28/07
Helene of Troy
PIA09015
 
3/15/07
Helene and Mimas
PIA08897
 
12/29/06
Helene
PIA08335
 
9/15/06
Helene's Close-up
PIA08269
 

 

 
7/21/05
Helene from Afar
PIA07547
 
12/28/09
Splinters of Rings
PIA12514
 
2/2/09
It's Full of Moons!
PIA10569
 
9/19/07
Moons that Share
PIA09731
 
6/28/06
New Moon
PIA08209
 

 

 
4/25/06
The Enceladus Ring
PIA08163
 
12/21/05
Small Worlds of Saturn
PIA07657
 
5/2/05
Dione's Companion
PIA06639
 
4/20/05
Moons Off the Port Bow
PIA06631
 
2/24/05
Telesto: Companion of Tethys
PIA06592
 

 






Newsroom - Press Releases

 
CASSINI FINDS TREASURES AMONG THE RINGS AND SMALL SATELLITES OF SATURN - Feb 24, 2005
 ... in its orbit around a planet. Helene is a previously-known 32-kilometer ...







Newsroom - Special Events

 
Helene Rev 149 Raw Preview - Jun 20, 2011
 ... encounter with Saturn's icy moon Helene, beaming down raw images of the ... 4,330 miles (6,968 kilometers) of Helene's surface. It was the second closest approach to Helene of the entire mission.Cassini ...


 
Helene, Enceladus, Mimas Rev 144 Raw Preview - Feb 1, 2011
 ... unprocessed images of Saturn's moons Helene, Enceladus and Mimas were taken ... 28,000 kilometers (17,398 miles) of Helene. It also caught a glimpse of Mimas ...


 
Helene Rev127 Flyby Raw Preview - Mar 3, 2010
 ... unprocessed images of Saturn's moon Helene were taken on March 3, 2010 ...







Newsroom - Looking Ahead

 
Rev165 - Apr 19, 2012
 


 
Rev164 - Apr 4, 2012
 


 
Rev163 - Mar 15, 2012
 


 
Rev162 - Feb 29, 2012
 


 
Rev159 - Dec 19, 2011
 








Alliance Member Comments


Rev133
Mercury_3488      
2010-06-21 16:06:46

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Myself I would rather use any excess fuel for a close pass of fascinating Dione or Mimas or one of the lesser known inner moons like Prometheus, Pandora, or a co orbital like Helene, Ploydeuces, Telesto or Calypso. We have had loads of Titan & Enceladus, so a close pass of one of the lesser known ones would be nice. Shame we cannot do Iapetus or Phoebe again, as far too far out.


Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #2
enceladus5      
2010-03-12 17:39:13

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Nice photo fo Helene with Saturn in the background. Similar to a dramatic cloesup photo of Janus.


Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #2
PolishBear      
2010-03-04 14:17:57

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Lovely photo of Helene. I was also wondering about the little streak to the left; it almost looks like a meteor.


Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #2
ultomatt      
2010-03-04 11:43:27

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WOW!!! Awesome shot of Helene! More of the small moons...please (and thank you)!


Helene "Rev 127" Flyby Raw Preview #2
enceladus5      
2010-03-03 18:06:17

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Another example of Cassini's awesome capabilities. What a great closeup of Helene and various craters on its rugged surface.


Hyperion Raw Preview #5
Mercury_3488      
2008-12-08 13:35:03

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Hi Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971, Hyperion's ultra low density amazes me. 0.55 g cm3, the least dense solid object known in the solar system. The deep craters certainly looked like punched in material, although IIRC many are thought to have burned into the ice with dark floors absorbing the little solar radiation this far from the Sun. I am aware that there are no further very close passes planned for Hyperion, but are any decent further passes possible, lets say less than 100,000 KM? Or for that matter, any of the other minor moons other than the close Helene pass planned? A closeish pass of Mimas would also be quite interesting, particularly with density measurements & to see whether or not the surface is peppered with smaller & smaller craters, or they cut off below a certain size, as with Jupiter's Callisto? Andrew Brown.


Profile of Janus
Mercury_3488      
2008-08-14 06:51:30

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Great image. Saw this once before as a shadowy noisey raw image. It's great to see that some of the smaller moons are also being researched like Hyperion, Janus, Epimetheus, Helene, Telesto, Phoebe, etc. Wonder if Janus is like Epimetheus, an icy rubble pile held together by gravity? Does anyone know when the Helene encounter will be? Is there any chance of a close passes of Calypso, Telesto (again) Polydeuces, etc? Andrew Brown.


Cosmic Blasting Zone
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-16 07:57:58

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I've sometimes wondered about this also. Hyperion is the least dense of the known solid bodies in the entire solar system, only 0.55g cm3. This suggests a rubble pile held together by gravity & / or a more coherent body with huge internal voids. My bet is the rubble pile. Like polystyrene, it is possible to punch deep but narrow holes in it. We see similar here on Hyperion. I had seen one suggestion bantered about elsewhere (not my idea), that Titan formed in a heliocentric orbit at one of Saturn's lagrange points & over time, Titan was drawn towards Saturn. Hyperion was suggested to be Titan's former moon. The mass ratio between Hyperion & Titan is identical to that of Dione with Polydeuces & Helene as well as Tethys with Telesto & Calypso. These facts were part of a thought exercise elsewhere. Hyperion being a former comet is an interesting idea. Remember that Phoebe is almost certainly a captured comet / KBO. Also remember the floors of these deep craters are dark, so they absorb the very little solar energy there is & can burn through the ice. I am sure there are a whole multitude of reasons for Hyperion's weird situation. A most fascinating object.


Epimetheus Revealed
Mercury_3488      
2008-02-03 11:59:29

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Most of these smaller moons appear to be 'rubble piles' of ice & maybe rock. Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, Telesto, Calypso, Polydeuces, Helene, etc. Phoebe appears to be more coherent, but then Phoebe most likely formed elsewhere, maybe the Kuiper Belt, got ejected & then captured by Saturn later on. The other smaller Saturn moons & Jupiter's Amalthea, appear to be rubble piles held together by gravity.


Helene, Enceladus, Mimas Rev 144 Raw Preview
Frankypouh      
2011-02-07 20:18:06

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Helene is just coming out from the hair dresser! It looks like Helene is a piece from a bigger body after a collision


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