CICLOPS: Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for OPerationS

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Imaging Diary - Cassini

 
9/20/17
The Mimas Atlas
PIA17217
 
6/13/17
Mimas Polar Maps - June 2017
PIA17215
 
6/13/17
Map of Mimas - June 2017
PIA17214
 
6/5/17
Mimas Dwarfed
PIA21331
 
3/14/17
Farewell to Mimas
PIA17213
 

 

 
2/1/17
Mimas 'Rev 259' Raw Preview #2
 
2/1/17
Mimas 'Rev 259' Raw Preview #1
 
1/9/17
Mimas' Mountain
PIA20515
 
11/28/16
Tiny Mimas, Huge Rings
PIA20509
 
4/13/15
Mimas by Saturnshine
PIA18312
 

 

 
11/4/14
Color Maps of Mimas - November 2014
PIA18437
 
9/15/14
Crescent Mimas
PIA18285
 
3/3/14
Mimas and Spokes
PIA17154
 
3/18/13
Mimas Peeks Over Saturn
PIA14652
 
8/16/12
Mimas Polar Maps - June 2012
PIA14927
 

 

 
8/16/12
Map of Mimas - June 2012
PIA14926
 
7/30/12
Peeping Mimas
PIA14619
 
4/11/11
Mimas' Flat Spot
PIA12761
 
2/1/11
Mimas 'Rev 144' Raw Preview #1
 
11/8/10
An Eye on Mimas
PIA12739
 

 

 
7/28/10
The Mimas Atlas
PIA12793
 
5/13/10
Mimas Polar Maps - February 2010
PIA12782
 
5/13/10
Map of Mimas - February 2010
PIA12780
 
4/22/10
Mimas' Stretched Shadow
PIA12617
 
3/29/10
Bizarre Temperatures on Mimas
PIA12867
 

 

 
3/29/10
Streaks and Markings on Mimas
PIA12569
 
3/29/10
Mimas Three-Quarter Portrait
PIA12574
 
2/15/10
Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #3
 
2/15/10
Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #4
 
2/15/10
Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #2
 

 

 
2/15/10
Mimas "Rev 126" Flyby Raw Preview #1
 
2/3/10
Rugged Mimas
PIA12541
 
1/22/10
Blemished by Mimas
PIA12533
 
1/21/10
Mimas Globe
PIA12532
 
12/11/09
Mimas and Pan
PIA11643
 

 

 
12/10/09
Oblate Mimas
PIA11642
 
8/12/09
Mimas' Bulging Middle
PIA11556
 
6/22/09
Eclipsing Mimas
PIA11661
 
1/15/09
Saturn and Mimas
PIA10557
 
12/23/08
Mimas Before Saturn
PIA10540
 

 

 
11/3/08
Mimas Above the Haze
PIA10504
 
10/17/08
The Mimas Atlas
PIA11117
 
10/17/08
Map of Mimas - June 2008
PIA11118
 
10/6/08
Mimas in Profile
PIA10484
 
9/26/08
Mimas Adrift
PIA10478
 

 

 
4/15/08
High Above Mimas
PIA09880
 
1/9/08
Rough, Icy Mimas
PIA09811
 
12/20/07
Mimas Emerges
PIA09797
 
10/16/07
Mimas and the Great Division
PIA09750
 
8/31/07
Mimas in Transit
PIA09018
 

 







Imaging Diary - Voyager

 
10/14/07
Saturn and its satellites Tethys, Enceladus and Mimas
PIA01383
 
10/14/07
Saturn's moon Mimas
PIA01968
 
10/14/07
Mimas - large impact structure
PIA02266
 
10/14/07
Mimas - cratered surface
PIA02267
 
10/14/07
Saturn and Four Icy Moons, Enhanced Color
PIA00349
 

 

 
10/14/07
Saturn and Four Icy Moons in Natural Color
PIA00400
 
10/14/07
Saturn System Montage
PIA01482
 
10/14/07
Saturn taken from Voyager 2
PIA01364
 
10/14/07
Outer edge of Saturn's B-ring
PIA01390
 
10/14/07
Pictures of Tethys' large crater
PIA01385
 

 

 
10/14/07
Collage of Saturn's smaller satellites (PIA01954)
PIA01954
 
10/14/07
Tethys
PIA02276





Newsroom - Press Releases

 
CASSINI FLIES BY SATURN'S TORTURED MOON MIMAS - Aug 5, 2005
 ... FLIES BY SATURN'S TORTURED MOON MIMASOn its recent close flyby of Mimas, the Cassini spacecraft found ... seen in the new images.The new Mimas images are available at http://ciclops.org, ... available ...


 
1980S VIDEO ICON GLOWS ON SATURN MOON - Mar 29, 2010
 ... and images of Saturn's icy moon Mimas obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft ... the spotlight, but it turns out Mimas is more bizarre than we thought ... infrared spectrometer, which mapped Mimas' ...


 
CASSINI UNCOVERS GALACTIC BEHAVIOR, EXPLAINS LONG-STANDING PUZZLES IN SATURN'S RINGS - Nov 1, 2010
 ... affected by the gravity of the moon Mimas. This process is commonly believed ... Saturn's rings due to the moon Mimas. Resonances in Saturn's rings ... particles orbits. In the case of the Mimas ...


 
CASSINI IMAGES RING ARCS AMONG SATURN'S MOONS - Sep 5, 2008
 ... gravity of the nearby larger moon Mimas disturbs their orbits. Gravitational ... in Saturn's magnificent rings. Mimas provides a regular gravitational ... orbits due to their resonance with Mimas, ...


 
FROM DARK OBSCURITY... A TINY NEW SATURNIAN MOON COMES TO LIGHT - Jul 19, 2007
 ... moons orbit between much larger Mimas and Enceladus.Moons surrounding ... Methone, is in such a resonance with Mimas and appears to have undergone ... 4 are dynamically locked with Mimas gives us a ...



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Newsroom - Special Events

 
Farewell to Mimas - Mar 14, 2017
 ... close approach to Saturn's moon Mimas on January 30, 2017 ...


 
Mimas and Epimetheus 'Rev 259' Raw Preview - Feb 1, 2017
 ... unprocessed images of Saturn's moons Mimas and Epimetheus during a close ...


 
Methone and Tethys Rev 166 Raw Preview - May 21, 2012
 ... and Anthe, between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus. The three tiny ...


 
Dione Rev 158 Raw Preview - Dec 12, 2011
 ... moons in some of these views. Mimas appears just beyond the dark side ...


 
Helene, Enceladus, Mimas Rev 144 Raw Preview - Feb 1, 2011
 ... Saturn's moons Helene, Enceladus and Mimas were taken on Jan. 31, 2011. Cassini ... Helene. It also caught a glimpse of Mimas in front of Saturn's rings. In ...


 
A Story of Saturn's Rings - Nov 1, 2010
 ... gravitational influence of Saturn's moon Mimas, mountainous structures along ...


 
Closest Views of Cratered Mimas - Mar 29, 2010
 ... closest flyby of Saturn's moon Mimas generated views of this "Death ...


 
Mimas and Calypso Rev 126 Flyby Raw Preview - Feb 15, 2010
 ... unprocessed images of Saturn's moons Mimas and Calypso were taken on Feb. ...


 
Mimas...Closer Than Ever Before - Aug 5, 2005
 Cassini's closest flyby of Mimas on August 2nd revealed it to be one of the most heavily cratered Saturnian moons, with variations in color across its surface but little if any evidence for internal activity.







Home - Captain's Logs

 
A Story of Saturn's Rings - Nov 1, 2010
 ... orbital gravitational resonance with Mimas known to be responsible for its ... to become trapped in the strong Mimas resonance at the B ring's edge ...


 
The Day the Earth Smiled - Nov 12, 2013
 ... planet, to the upper right,is Mimas ... only a crescent but also casting ...


 
A Year of Splendor - Dec 31, 2008
 ... Anthe and Methone in orbit between Mimas and Enceladus, and eyed the vast ...


 
A Year of Surveillance - Dec 29, 2006
 ... perturbation by the Saturnian moon, Mimas. Finally, additional high resolution ...


 
Preparations for Landing - Jan 11, 2005
 ... wider than the Saturnian moon, Mimas. And feathery black streaks and ...



Result Page: 1 2  Next





Maps

 
9/20/17
The Mimas Atlas
PIA17217
 
6/13/17
Mimas Polar Maps - June 2017
PIA17215
 
6/13/17
Map of Mimas - June 2017
PIA17214
 
11/4/14
Color Maps of Mimas - November 2014
PIA18437
 
11/4/14
Color Maps of Tethys - November 2014
PIA18439
 

 






Artroom

 
7/22/10
Storm Over Mimas
 
1/11/10
Mimas/Tethys Eclipse
 

 

 
12/28/06
Mimas on the Half Shell
 
12/28/06
Mimas
 

 

 
12/30/14
Coasting Above the Rings
 
7/22/10
Saturn Impact
 

 

 
3/10/09
Rhea's Sigh
 
1/18/07
Saturn From Rhea
 

 

 
12/28/06
The Sword of Herschel
 
12/28/06
From Polar Orbit
 

 


Result Page: 1 2  Next





Newsroom - Looking Ahead

 
Rev269-270 - Apr 3, 2017
 


 
Rev261-262 - Jan 27, 2017
 


 
Rev259-260 - Jan 13, 2017
 


 
Rev250 - Nov 9, 2016
 


 
Rev249 - Nov 1, 2016
 








Alliance Member Comments


Ring Shapers
Red_dragon      
2008-11-28 10:40:44

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Yet even another dramatic image from Cassini's NAC. It looks as Mimas and Prometheus were over the rings and at the same distance.


Enceladus Rev 91 Flyby - Skeet Shoot #8
Dragon_of_Luck_Mah_Jonng1971      
2008-11-05 14:59:10

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This time the IMAGES with high and very high resolution ( official ones and raw ones ) returned of a Enceladus flyby were greater than from any previous close Enc flyby - but all the other close flybys had also great Enc pictures. When I made a search for the latest Hi-Res Enc Images on the Cassini Mission Main Page ( http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ ) some hours ago, I found over 200 of them ! But the Image 'Boulder-Strewn Surface NAC View' ( many older ) is very remarkable and a new look, too. These Hi-Res Images of Enc with its icy, alien surface were GREAT !!! THAT is exploring new territories ! ( new worlds ! ) Now I think we know too less of the interior of Enc to explain exactly why it has got this surface. I think the crust ( of course icy ) is thin in the south ( roughly 2 km to 250 meters ). Under the crust there is ( probably ) a subsurface ocean of liquid H20 being roughly 273 to 277 K. How deep is this ocean ? I have no idea. Is it global or local ? I just don`t know. The surface in the south with its 'tiger stripes' ( 'sulci" ) lets me think of the sulci being rather similar to Earth's rift zones but on Enc there are far more ones than on Earth. And I also think that on Enc the activities and the locations of those sulci are shifting very rapidly compared to Earth. Of course the south polar region is geologically very young. Then I need this subsurface ocean for my theory because I suppose that the outer mantle of Enceladus is this ocean that has got very many convection cells that are driving all the active 'sulci' . So there are plates on Enc and they are moving like at plate tectonics ( more or less ). Often we're seeing compressed ice terrain at the areas adjacent to the most active 'sulci' - that is something like Enceladan mountain formation . perhaps there is happening subduction because the surface mustn't increase in area. The surface is 95 to 99 percent pure H20 ice. It's very bright. Some few patterns of Enceladan activity remind me a bit of common features at Earth's glaciers. The inner mantle could be a mixture of ice and rock or water ( ?? ) , ice and rock. The core could be rocky. I think the core is only rock, with no water and no ice. Because the interior of Enc is far hotter than it 'should' be, I believe this moon to be differentiated ( crust, mantle, core ) completely. I think that in the south the crust is thinnest below the large ( active ) 'sulci'. There water or water and ice mixed is penetrating the crust through cracks generating this moon's famous geysers. Today we have no temperature values at all of Enc's Interior making it even more difficult for me to think how its interior is like - especially how much water there is and if there's life in the upper mantle. But this is all only guessing. Now we know very few about the interior of Enc. Its density is now believed to be 1.6 g/cm3. For A New Saturn mission there is needed an unmanned lander ( at least ) for Enceladus. ( of Saturn's moons ) That one shall be like the ( today neither finished nor launched ) Europa orbiter ( lander ) landing on Europa and then melting thru the Europan ice crust and then if there is water it shall continue as a small submarine with a chemical laboratory. Of course it has to transmit its finding to Earth when diving in Europa. Or a Enceladus Rover that could drive/climb around and follow the warmth by its temperature sensors. Then it shall melt thru the thinnest part of the southern Enc crust. If there were water pockets it would find them. That is now just dreaming. I wrote a lot but now it's finished. The activity of Enc compared to Mimas is a mistery. And Io's activity at Jupiter is also partly misterious because it's explained not completely by tidal heating. All the latest images of the 2008 Halloween Enc flyby were very interesting !


Shadow Cap
Red_dragon      
2008-09-16 03:27:22

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Least to say, striking; it looks as if Mimas was disguising of Iapetus.


Profile of Janus
ultomatt      
2008-08-14 13:38:46

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I love this shot of Janus! I fully understand the need to focus on Titan, and the results of all the flybys have been stupendous, but I must say, imaging of the small moons is very interesting to me. Also, the other large moons, Iapetus in particular, are of great interest to me. Iapetus is a mysterious object, and even with the two close flybys, remains so. The imaging of its equatorial mountain range was quite literally, stunning! I spotted multiple landslides of enormous scale on the flanks of the mountain range, but I've not seen any discussion of those amazing slump features. There is one other really dramatic landslide in evidence on Iapetus, within one of the large craters. This large crater is approximately 375 miles across, and features a smaller, 75 mile diameter crater within it, that appears to have impacted such that it's rim is almost exactly tangent to the inner rim of the larger crater. This smaller crater is nearly half filled with an enormous landslide that propagated off the rim of the larger crater, which at this location is about 15km high! From the looks of the landslide, it appears to be perhaps 5km thick? When that landslide cut loose, it's impossible to imagine the forces involved...truly an awesome feature on Iapetus! The best image I've seen of it is at the following address... http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA06171.jpg Great examples of massive slumping are evident on many of the moons, including the bright splat crater on Rhea, which has large lobular flows off of it's crater walls. That one in particular brought a question to my mind, which is, where did the energy come from to soften that material enough to cause the mass slippage? The crater floor is peppered with small craters, but the landslides are free of craters, which indicates that the slumping occurred long after the formation of the crater, and at least geologically speaking, perhaps not so long ago (a billion years?)...which makes the question of where the energy came from even more interesting. I thought, other nearby impacts, but the lobular form of the slides would seem to indicate liquefaction occurred...which would seem to indicate thermal energy transfer? The related image (wide angle) that I've looked at was taken on November, 26, 2005, is as follows...W00012124...an amazing image to be sure. So...anyone have theories on how those lobular flows were formed, in such a low energy environment? One other moon that has been woefully missed, in terms of hi-resolution imagery, is Mimas. No hi-res imagery of the crater Herschel have been captured, only medium res. It's clear from the medium res imagery that this crater has been filled with mass slumping...but the lack of hi-res imagery makes it very frustrating. And while this post might indicate otherwise, I'm NOT obsessed with landslides! I think I've written enough for now... Matt


Enceladus Rev 80 Flyby Skeet Shoot #3
Mercury_3488      
2008-08-14 07:06:02

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Hi rgedaly. It is reckoned that Enceladus has rolled over. Jupiter's moon Io is another point. Some of the larger plumes on Io like Tvashtar are in the higher latitudes than the equator. Dione also appears to have extentional faults & graben too. It is thought that Dione is partially responsible, for the heating of Enceladu, but Dione too, appears to have been very active at some point. Dione is approx 30 times the mass of Enceladus. What caused Dione to be active? Rhea??????? Yet Rhea appears as dead as a dodo, with not much happening there other being cratered. it's interesting to see the pattern outwards from Saturn. Mimas. Inactive cratered. Enceladus, active. Tethys. Inactive, cratered. Dione, has been active, possibly still is on a small level. Rhea. Second largest of Saturn's moons, inactive, cratered. Titan. Possibly very active, with cryovolcanoes & tectonic activity. Iapetus. Inactive, cratered, but with a huge equatorial mountain belt, possibly home to some of the highest peaks not on Mars & Io. Some parts of the south polar region on Enceladus does resemble Europa in may respects, yet Europa is approx 500 times Enceladus's mass. It is interesting to see how similar landforms appear on bodies that cover a woide range of size & mass. Andrew Brown.


Map of Tethys - June 2008
carolyn      
2008-08-10 09:33:28

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You think this is boring? What about Mimas?!!! It's a good thing there's Herschel crater or there would be no drama at all on Mimas. Now, as a member of a collection of bodies, it and the other `boring' moons provide valuable points of comparison in their mass densities, compositions, cratering records, etc, so they really aren't as boring as they look. In fact, they are quite valuable and we're glad to have the opportunity to explore them. But for exquisite geological formations and that instinctive `I wanna go there' emotion they evoke, it's hard to beat Enceladus, Titan, Iapetus, and even Dione.


Tethys: Leading Hemisphere
Red_dragon      
2008-07-15 10:23:36

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Great image, perhaps one of the best Tethys images you've released; I like her Mimas/eye/Death Star look.


Odysseus the Great
bruno.thiery      
2008-07-12 07:48:40

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It is surely a question that has been asked a thousand times, sorry for that. The Herschel impact crater on Mimas is always presented with much awe as the result of an event that nearly shattered this moon. But Odysseus is even larger compared to he size of Tehtys. Is Ithaca chasma the scar of this terrible impact, or is it unrelated? If it is unrelated, then are there signs of the stressful event elsewhere?


The North Polar Region of Enceladus
Mercury_3488      
2008-03-15 16:43:05

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Hi bruno_thiery, Need to look again, but I had seen somewhere that the ridges / striations in Samakand Sulci & Sarandip Planitia are between 200 - 300 metres in height & that the surface gravity of Enceladus is roughly 1/200th G or one half of one percent of Earth's, so not very strong. I think on the whole, tidal influences of Saturn & Dione appear popular causes as to the current activity. I sometimes wonder if what we are seeing is only temporary? To me it looks like continuing outgassing from a huge impact event & the heat is fossil heat from said impact. The Tiger Stripes & surrounding area looks to me like hardening skin on paint in a paint pot with no lid. The northern hemisphere with softened impact craters, would suggest to me that impact energy was temporarily converted to heat, thus softening ice away from the impact site. Neighbouring inner Mimas also the scene of a huge impact creating the Herschel Crater, was on a pure brittle ice moon, that nearly shattered. Enceladus is very different, somewhat denser & differentiated, behaved very differently. I cannot help but think that this is impact related, happening fairly recently in the geological past. We'll know more to either reinforce or dismiss this idea in the coming encounters. Andrew Brown.


Enceladus '61EN' Flyby Raw Preview #3
Mercury_3488      
2008-03-13 17:31:26

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Hi volcanopele, I wonder if the active area in the south is a remnant of a giant impact basin? The area & striation seem to be circular around the curcumferance, with the Tiger Stripes, looking like hardening skin on paint in a paintpot with no lid? The cratered north to me does not look primeval, yes there are a lot of craters, but they are softened, like many on Dione, Jupiter's Ganymede & the Uranus moons Titania & Oberon, certainly being cryovolcanic bodies in the past, until fairly 'recent' times geologically speaking. The sharp demarkation between the cratered & 'newer' terrain you picked up on, seems to suggest to me that the ice crustal thickness, increases suddenly from south to north, perhaps also an impact consequence? The neighbouring moon Mimas was nearly destroyed in the collision that created the Herschel Crater, but then Mimas is near enough pure ice, that was brittle. Enceladus being composed with a larger amount of rock, perhaps even differentiated behaved differently, the huge impact scar, filled with cryolava instead, creating this weird surface & dichotomous morphology? Andrew Brown.







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